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  • Athletes, brain injury, depression, and suicide :: U-M Psychiatry and Depression Center Newsroom
    risky pain pill use to the ER Study shows promise Fashion design meets U M research in wearable human stem cell images Featured Video Recent Posts Dr Monica Starkman professor emeritus publishes novel based on career in psychiatry Who gets hooked on drugs who stays clean Study in rats finds genetic markers that influence addiction UMHS community mourns death of Kenneth Silk M D Taking the fight against risky pain

    Original URL path: http://ummentalhealth.info/2011/08/23/athletes-brain-injury-depression-and-suicide/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Veterans helping veterans :: U-M Psychiatry and Depression Center Newsroom
    life Buddy to Buddy is part of M SPAN Military Support Programs and Networks which includes programs developed by the Depression Center the Department of Psychiatry and other partners Listen to the interview here http www michiganradio org post helping fellow veterans Recent Entries Dr Monica Starkman professor emeritus publishes novel based on career in psychiatry Who gets hooked on drugs who stays clean Study in rats finds genetic markers that influence addiction UMHS community mourns death of Kenneth Silk M D Taking the fight against risky pain pill use to the ER Study shows promise Fashion design meets U M research in wearable human stem cell images Featured Video Recent Posts Dr Monica Starkman professor emeritus publishes novel based on career in psychiatry Who gets hooked on drugs who stays clean Study in rats finds genetic markers that influence addiction UMHS community mourns death of Kenneth Silk M D Taking the fight against risky pain pill use to the ER Study shows promise Fashion design meets U M research in wearable human stem cell images Twitter Tweets Categories Featured Honors Awards In Memoriam In the News UMHS Press Release Uncategorized Tags addiction alcohol alcoholism antipsychotics anxiety autism bipolar bipolar

    Original URL path: http://ummentalhealth.info/2011/11/15/veterans-helping-veterans/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Antipsychotics associated with higher mortality risk in older bipolar patients :: U-M Psychiatry and Depression Center Newsroom
    that suggests antipsychotics are associated with a significantly increased mortality risk in those with late life bipolar disorder The study was supported by a National Institute of Mental Health grant to principal investigator Helen C Kales M D Recent Entries Dr Monica Starkman professor emeritus publishes novel based on career in psychiatry Who gets hooked on drugs who stays clean Study in rats finds genetic markers that influence addiction UMHS community mourns death of Kenneth Silk M D Taking the fight against risky pain pill use to the ER Study shows promise Fashion design meets U M research in wearable human stem cell images Featured Video Recent Posts Dr Monica Starkman professor emeritus publishes novel based on career in psychiatry Who gets hooked on drugs who stays clean Study in rats finds genetic markers that influence addiction UMHS community mourns death of Kenneth Silk M D Taking the fight against risky pain pill use to the ER Study shows promise Fashion design meets U M research in wearable human stem cell images Twitter Tweets Categories Featured Honors Awards In Memoriam In the News UMHS Press Release Uncategorized Tags addiction alcohol alcoholism antipsychotics anxiety autism bipolar bipolar disorder bipolar research cancer

    Original URL path: http://ummentalhealth.info/2011/03/23/antipsychotics-associated-with-mortality-risk-in-older-bipolar-patients/ (2016-05-02)
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  • A new factor in depression? Brain protein discovery could lead to better treatments :: U-M Psychiatry and Depression Center Newsroom
    studied another FGF molecule called FGF2 in the brain for years trying to figure out why it s lower in people and animals with depression and other mental health disorders They ve even shown that giving FGF2 injections can calm anxious rats The team was surprised when FGF9 levels were higher in the brains of people who had had depression compared to those who had not The increased levels held up even after they accounted for differences in the ways the individuals lived and died before their brain tissue was preserved for research They made the finding using post mortem brain samples from the Pritzker collection 36 depressed and 56 non depressed brains in all Through three different kinds of microarray gene expression studies and a confirming test called quantitative PCR they looked at all the genetic activity that was going on when these brain donors died specifically in the area of the brain called the hippocampus The hippocampus is a crucial area of the brain for memory learning and stress control It has been found to be smaller in people with depression and this is thought to be the result of chronic stress that affects the health of brain cells in that region Each experiment showed higher FGF9 levels in the depressed brains What s more the levels of several other fibroblast growth factors were down when FGF9 was up suggesting that the entire system for regulating cell growth and development in the brains of depressed people was altered Rodent studies reveal FGF9 function Intrigued by the human results the team decided to explore FGF9 s role further through experiments with rats This allowed them to do something they can t do in humans try to determine if FGF9 rises in response to something such as stress or if levels are naturally higher and predispose someone to depression First they exposed rats to repeated social stress over a week and a half and looked at the levels of FGF9 in various regions of the brain s hippocampus Not only did the levels rise but the rats got more socially withdrawn and less likely to maintain a healthy weight Next they looked at what happens if FGF9 is injected into the brain specifically the ventricle or open space between the brain s two sides Other rats received a placebo The rats that got the FGF9 acted more anxious and moved around less and these depression like changes persisted with repeated injections Lastly the group created a virus that interfered with FGF9 production through a process called RNA interference They injected it or a comparison virus that didn t block FGF9 production into rats brains in a specific area of the hippocampus called the dentate gyrus The active virus caused levels of FGF9 to drop about 30 percent while other FGF molecule levels stayed the same And the rats showed less anxiety We call this approach reverse translation says Akil who is the Gardner Quarton Professor of Neurosciences a professor of

    Original URL path: http://ummentalhealth.info/2015/09/15/a-new-factor-in-depression-brain-protein-discovery-could-lead-to-better-treatments/ (2016-05-02)
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  • For women with bipolar disorder, sleep quality affects mood :: U-M Psychiatry and Depression Center Newsroom
    and migraine headaches Men tend to have shorter episodes and more time in between episodes Because of these factors we thought the impact that sleep quality might have on mood outcome in bipolar disorder may be different for men and women Saunders said The researchers analyzed data from 216 participants in the Prechter Longitudinal Study of Bipolar Disorder at the University of Michigan Medical School They looked at the effect of sleep quality at the beginning of the study on mood outcome over the next two years Mood outcome was measured by the severity frequency and variability of depressive or manic symptoms Variability meant how much the individuals went up and down in terms of their symptoms Saunders explained For women poor sleep quality predicted increased severity and frequency of depression and increased severity and variability of mania Among men baseline depression score and a personality trait called neuroticism were stronger predictors of mood outcome than sleep quality The research was published in the Journal of Affective Disorders One unanswered question is why poor sleep affects women with bipolar disorder more than men There could be a biological mechanism at work There is some suggestion from animal models that reproductive hormones affect the circadian rhythm system which is a biological system that affects our need to sleep Saunders said It could be that reproductive hormones are biologically affecting sleep in women and therefore also affecting mood outcomes Or it could have more to do with the type of sleep that women are getting We ll have to do more investigation into the biological underpinnings to understand that better Even before that question is answered Saunders says the message is clear We feel it s extremely important for clinicians and patients to recognize that sleep quality is an important factor that

    Original URL path: http://ummentalhealth.info/2015/07/01/for-women-with-bipolar-disorder-sleep-quality-affects-mood/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Shake it off? Not so easy for people with depression, new brain research suggests :: U-M Psychiatry and Depression Center Newsroom
    individual s ability to withstand social stress and to positively respond to positive social interactions says senior author Jon Kar Zubieta M D Ph D Social stressors are important factors that precipitate or worsen illnesses such as depression anxiety and other neuropsychiatric conditions This study examined mechanisms that are involved in the suppression of those stress responses he says The findings suggest novel potential targets for medication development that directly or indirectly target these circuits and biological factors that affect variation between individuals in recovery from this otherwise chronic and disabling illness Zubieta is a member of U M s Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience Institute and the U M Depression Center and is the Phil F Jenkins Research Professor of Depression in the Department of Psychiatry The new findings have already prompted the team to plan follow up studies to test individuals who are more sensitive to social stress and vulnerable to disorders such as social anxiety and depression and to test ways of boosting the opioid response Of course everyone responds differently to their social environment says Hsu To help us understand who is most affected by social stressors we re planning to investigate the influence of genes personality and the environment on the brain s ability to release opioids during rejection and acceptance Scanning the brain and finding surprises The research used an imaging technique called positron emission tomography or PET U M has a PET scanner devoted to research and a particle accelerator to make the short lived radioactive elements that enable PET scans to track specific brain activity The depressed individuals all met criteria for major depressive disorder and none was taking medication for the condition Before having their brains scanned the 17 depressed participants and 18 similar but non depressed participants each viewed photos and profiles of hundreds of other adults Each person selected profiles of people they were most interested in romantically similar to online dating During the brain scan participants were informed that the individuals they found attractive and interesting were not interested in them PET scans made during these moments of rejection showed both the amount and location of opioid release measured by looking at the availability of mu opioid receptors on brain cells The depressed individuals showed reduced opioid release in brain regions regulating stress mood and motivation During social acceptance when participants were informed that people liked them back both depressed and non depressed individuals reported feeling happy and accepted This surprised the researchers says Hsu because depression s symptoms often include a dulled response to positive events that should be enjoyable However the positive feeling in depressed individuals disappeared quickly after the period of social acceptance had ended and may be related to altered opioid responses But only non depressed people went on to report feeling motivated to connect socially with other people That feeling was accompanied by the release of opioids in a brain area called the nucleus accumbens a structure involved in reward and positive emotions The

    Original URL path: http://ummentalhealth.info/2015/03/02/shake-it-off-not-so-easy-for-people-with-depression-new-brain-research-suggests/ (2016-05-02)
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  • Managing the Culture of Stress at the Depression on College Campuses Conference :: U-M Psychiatry and Depression Center Newsroom
    in depth workshops concurrent sessions and a panel discussion This year s conference will feature two keynote presentations A Long term View of the Student Mental Health Crisis Lessons Learned over 25 Years by Michael D Young PhD Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs at the University of California Santa Barbara and Rethinking Stress The Role of Mindsets in Determining the Stress Response by Alia Crum PhD Assistant Professor of Psychology at Stanford University In addition to the conference sessions two undergraduate students will receive the 2015 Student Mental Health Advocate Award during the conference luncheon on March 12 The award will be presented by former WNBA star and Olympic Gold medalist Chamique Holdsclaw Chamique is a mental health advocate and author of the book Breaking Through Beating The Odds Shot After Shot She works to empower those who have struggled with mental health to go seek the professional help they need and to erase the stigma associated with mental health issues U M President Dr Mark S Schlissel will also be in attendance to provide opening remarks on Mar 11 Registration is free for students from any campus but an online registration form is still required The registration fee for non students is 150 Members of the media covering the event may register at no cost A conference schedule and additional information can be found at www depressioncenter org docc Established in 2001 the University of Michigan Comprehensive Depression Center UMDC is the first of its kind devoted entirely to bringing depression into the mainstream of medical research translational care education and public policy The Center is at the forefront in changing the paradigm of how depression and bipolar illnesses are understood and treated Recent Entries Dr Monica Starkman professor emeritus publishes novel based on career in psychiatry Who gets

    Original URL path: http://ummentalhealth.info/2015/02/12/managing-the-culture-of-stress-at-the-depression-on-college-campuses-conference/ (2016-05-02)
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  • U-M part of effort to study genetics of two mental health disorders :: U-M Psychiatry and Depression Center Newsroom
    disease which allowed for the large study he said Their Genomic Psychiatry Cohort collected DNA samples from 37 000 people with and without diseases who agreed to be a part of genomic epidemiological and clinical studies For the project titled Whole Genome Sequencing of Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder in the Genomic Psychiatry Cohort investigators at the Broad Institute will carry out genome sequencing and U M and Broad investigators will lead the analysis of the resulting data SPH researchers have been in the forefront of genomic research They have developed sophisticated computational and statistical tools for human gene mapping that have led to a greater understanding of bipolar disorder diabetes asthma cardiovascular disease and macular degeneration They also have been major contributors to a number of national projects including 1000 Genomes the first effort to sequence the DNA of a large group of people In addition to Boehnke U M researchers include Laura Scott SPH research associate professor Goncalo Abecasis chair of the Department of Biostatistics and Felix E Moore Collegiate Professor of Biostatistics Hyun Min Kang assistant professor in SPH and Melvin McInnis Thomas B and Nancy Upjohn Woodworth Professor of Bipolar Disorder and Depression and director of the H C Prechter Bipolar Research Fund in the Medical School Bipolar disorder also known as manic depressive illness is a brain disorder that causes mood shifts and dramatic ups and downs in energy and activity level Those with it often struggle with daily activities Schizophrenia also is a brain disorder that may cause those afflicted to hear voices and have irrational fears that people are reading their minds controlling their thoughts or plotting against them These disorders are among the leading causes of disability worldwide due to their early onset and chronic course There is clinical and genetic evidence of

    Original URL path: http://ummentalhealth.info/2014/10/01/u-m-part-of-effort-to-study-genetics-of-two-mental-health-disorders/ (2016-05-02)
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