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  • The Identification of Ecologically Sensitive Sub-Basins for Sustainable Development of Hydropower on Tributaries (ISH01) » Mekong River Commission
    Events Recent Events Consultations Newsletters Catch and Culture Transboundary Dialogue Speeches Working with MRC Employment Tenders Internship Junior Riparian Professional Highlights Data Portal Home About MRC Programmes Initiative on Sustainable Hydropower The Identification of Ecologically Sensitive Sub Basins for Sustainable Development of Hydropower on Tributaries ISH01 The Identification of Ecologically Sensitive Sub Basins for Sustainable Development of Hydropower on Tributaries ISH01 Introduction The ISH01 study on the Identification of Ecologically Sensitive Sub Basins for Sustainable Development of Hydropower on Tributaries aims to contribute to the achievement of the Strategic Priority Number 3 as formulated in the MRC s Basin Development Strategy 2011 2015 The Strategy emphasises the need for evaluation options for development of sustainable hydropower on tributaries addressing the risks of mainstream hydropower and assessing alternative energy options to mainstream hydropower In this context the need to move towards sustainable development of hydropower on tributaries is highlighted through identifying sub basins with high ecological value to be protected and those where hydropower can be developed with limited and environmental impacts ISH01 Implementation Technical approaches have been developed and consulted with the MRC countries a to identify Ecologically Sensitive Areas and b to provide a framework for sustainable hydropower planning and management in LMB tributaries Drawing on international regional and national experience the developed approaches provide a universal practical and replicable tool developed through three modules and 10 implementation steps ISH01 Resources Flyer ISH01 Pilot testing in the Sre Pok Sub Basin Final Report Study Report Related Publications Basin Development Strategy 2016 2020 Strategic Plan 2016 2020 browse all Development of Guidelines for Hydropower Environmental Impact Mitigation and Risk Management in the Lower Mekong Mainstream and Tributaries About the MRC History Vision Mission Organisational Structure Programmes Upstream Partners Development Partners Partner Organisations The Mekong Basin Physiography Hydrology Climate Natural Resources

    Original URL path: http://mrcmekong.mrcdev.info/about-mrc/programmes/initiative-on-sustainable-hydropower/the-identification-of-ecologically-sensitive-sub-basins-for-sustainable-development-of-hydropower-on-tributaries-ish01/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Guidelines for hydropower environmental impact mitigation and risk management in the Lower Mekong mainstream and tributaries (ISH0306) » Mekong River Commission
    to provide assurance that risks can be effectively minimized The ISH is seeking to enhance these Guidelines and to provide more effective and detailed documentation of the options and methods that may be used to cover the mitigation of hydropower risks in the Mekong based on the latest research and practice from around the world and the region and to expand the applicability of these Guidelines to the tributary developments The Development of the Guidelines The study is carrying out by reputed consulting firm who will provide a Core Team of suitably qualified experts together with two additional international consultants engaged by MRC to confirm and develop a generic practical process for risk and impact mitigation to support Member Countries in their assessment and implementation of mitigation options The idea is that mitigation is considered not only at the planning feasibility and design stages of the projects but also that the effectiveness of mitigation options is monitored and adaptations are made over the project lifecycle Measures proposed in the study must cover all aspects of the process The mitigation guidelines will be based on good industry practice and latest research and technical knowhow The mitigation guidelines will be based on good industrial practice and latest research and technical knowhow An example overview can be given as follows Case Study Implementation The Guidelines and their application in the Mekong will be tested in a number of ways Firstly existing applications of mitigation options and cases studies are sourced from regional hydropower projects or cascades in order to consider the lessons learned from those projects Secondly the team will be modeling in detail the cascade of 6 mainstream dams upstream of Vientiane to understand the best means of managing and mitigating the cumulative impacts of these dams on a range of environmental

    Original URL path: http://mrcmekong.mrcdev.info/about-mrc/programmes/initiative-on-sustainable-hydropower/guidelines-for-hydropower-environmental-impact-mitigation-and-risk-management-in-the-lower-mekong-mainstream-and-tributaries-ish0306/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Benefit Sharing Options for Hydropower on Mekong Tributaries (ISH13) » Mekong River Commission
    residents of the river basin who may lose access to water and other related resources To make up for the losses and spread the benefits expected from hydropower development benefit sharing mechanisms BSM are an important element of these projects planning Although most hydropower project include some measures of compensation for the people resettled from the project sites these constitute the bare minimum and are usually a one off package covered under the costs of the project financed by the developer In contrast benefit sharing consists of a range of long term mechanisms that governments apply based on an agreed regulatory framework Spreading the Benefits For hydropower development local benefit sharing should apply to communities living in the project impact zone as identified in for example project environmental and social impact assessments This would typically include individuals households entrepreneurs and local businesses based in the project area The intention is to go beyond the resettlement community to recognize others in the reservoir area upstream and downstream who may also be affected by the project Monetary and non monetary benefit sharing mechanisms may span the economic life of hydropower projects from planning to operations Unlike compensation which is usually covered under the projects costs benefit sharing typically takes a small percentage from the revenues generated by the project Monetary benefit sharing may include revenue and equity sharing taxes and royalties and preferential electricity tariffs to local communities These benefits are typically shared when the project starts generating revenue Non monetary forms range from facilitating access to natural resources and project related development opportunities for riverine communities to providing electricity connection and reliable electricity supply to communities in the project areas Additional indirect benefits include investments on public infrastructures human capacities and jobs BSM Resources BSM Flyer BSM Brochure BSM Synthesis Paper

    Original URL path: http://mrcmekong.mrcdev.info/about-mrc/programmes/initiative-on-sustainable-hydropower/benefit-sharing-options-for-hydropower-on-mekong-tributaries-ish13/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Mekong IWRMP Transboundary Projects » Mekong River Commission
    include a joint communication outreach project for Cambodia s Tonle Sap Lake and Thailand s Songkhla Lake basins a fishery management project in the Mekong and Sekong Rivers of Cambodia and Lao PDR and a wetland and floodplain management project in Lao PDR s Xe Bang Hieng and Thailand s Nam Kam regions Between Cambodia and Viet Nam there are two water resource management projects being jointly implemented in the Sesan and Srepok Rivers sub basins and the Mekong Delta While the sister lakes communication project focuses on community outreach activities to promote peer to peer learning on good governance of the lake basins to improve resource based livelihoods in the communities the four other projects encourage transboundary dialogues to identify significant water resource management issues such as floods the impacts of climate change and fisheries management The output from these transboundary projects will contribute to developing a joint management and decision making mechanism to address the issues at national and sub national levels These projects are designed to create a better institutional framework to build knowledge disseminate existing expertise and improve decision making for the sustainable development of water and related resources It is expected that these projects will demonstrate the importance of IWRM based transboundary management and cooperation as well as the usefulness of the application of MRC Procedures and tools The five projects were launched in late 2013 through to mid 2014 and are currently undertaking baseline studies to identify common significant water resource management issues through field assessments and exchange visits among other activities at each of the pilot sites The transboundary component is financed by the World Bank and facilitated by the MRC Secretariat Each project is expected to be completed in three years The five projects are Tonle Sap Lake and Songkhla Lake Basins

    Original URL path: http://mrcmekong.mrcdev.info/about-mrc/programmes/mekong-integrated-water-resources-management-project/transboundary-projects-under-the-m-iwrmp/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Cambodia and Viet Nam formally open-up cross-border river trade on the Mekong » Mekong River Commission
    Reap and many more sites that attract tourists Shipping on the Lower Mekong River has previously not been conducted in a consistent manner said Capt Lieven Geerinck MRC Chief Technical Advisor Now shipping companies can plan with confidence when exactly their containers will arrive at destination It is all about reliability The agreement will also put in place a range of measures for ensuring river traffic safety and regulating the transportation of dangerous goods by river By standardising rules and regulations the MRC claims that there will be a considerable improvement to the safety of the shipping of oil and hazardous liquid cargoes port services and safe navigation The new regulations cover the Mekong River the Tonle Sap Bassac and Vam Nao rivers as well as a number of canals in Viet Nam and apply to all kinds of vessels including sea going ships under foreign flag The MRC says that improving river transport infrastructure will also reduce greenhouse gas emissions normally associated with land based transport River freight produces on average about one fifth of the greenhouse gas CO2 per ton per km that is produced by trucking goods on the road ends Related Documents Agreement on Waterway Transportation between the Government of Socialist Republic of Viet Nam and the Loyal Government of Cambodia The agreement is available in 3 languages English Khmer Vietnamese Notes to Editors A map of regulated waterways under the treaty is available on request For further details or a copy of the complete agreement please contact the sender of this e mail or use the address at the bottom of the page The Agreement between the Royal Government of Cambodia and the Government of the Socialist Republic of Viet Nam on Waterway Transportation was signed on 17 December 2009 at the Royal Palace in Phnom Penh by H E Mom Sibon Secretary of State Cambodian Ministry of Public Works and Transport and H E Le Manh Hung Vice Minister Vietnamese Ministry of Transport According to the wording of the document The Contracting Parties shall refrain from adopting any measures or regulations that might directly or indirectly impair navigability or make it permanently more difficult and shall take as soon as possible the necessary measures to remove all obstacles and hazards to navigation Both countries have agreed to grant to each other s vessels most favoured nation treatment according to the wording of the treaty A Mekong Navigation Facilitation Committee will be established to implement and monitor the Agreement which will also examine complaints from the waterway users of all nationalities and will co operate with the MRC and the National Mekong Committees in the basin Formulation of the agreement and facilitation of the process was done under the MRC s Navigation Programme which aims to improve the legal framework for encouraging freedom of navigation in the Mekong River system thereby implementing Article 9 of the 1995 Agreement on the Cooperation for the Sustainable Development of the Mekong River Basin The agreement was modelled on

    Original URL path: http://mrcmekong.mrcdev.info/news-and-events/news/cambodia-and-viet-nam-formally-open-up-cross-border-river-trade-on-the-mekong/ (2016-05-01)
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  • Physiographic Regions » Mekong River Commission
    places with no significant tributaries in this stretch Lancang Basin Located south of the Three Rivers Area this highland and plateau area is still relatively elevated 2 000 3 000 metres above sea level but transitions to mid and lowland reaches as the Mekong flows down a steep gradient broadening as it goes Small tributary catchments drain into the river from both sides of the mainstream Northern Highlands The Northern Highlands form the upland region covering northeastern Myanmar northern Thailand and the northern areas of the Lao PDR Large tributaries including the Nam Ta Nam Ou Nam Soung and Nam Khan enter at the Mekong s left bank while the Nam Mae Kok and Nam Mae Ing enter at the right bank Khorat Plateau Lying largely within northeastern Thailand the Khorat Plateau is a vast low lying terrain consisting mainly of sediment and eroded bedrock and surrounded by a rim of highly resistant sandstone Here the Mekong River is joined by the Songkhram and Mun Rivers on the right bank and the Nam Ca Dinh Se Bang Fai and Se Bang Hiang Rivers on the left bank Tonle Sap Basin The Mekong flows through a broad valley to the east of the Khorat Plateau and enters the Tonle Sap Basin just north of Pakse The Tonle Sap Basin is a large alluvial plain surrounded by hills At the southern end of the Basin the mainstream breaks up into a complex network of branching and reconnecting channels The western and central parts of the Tonle Sap Basin make up the Great Lake The Great Lake The Tonle Sap Lake also known as the Tonle Sap Great Lake is located is located in the Cambodian floodplain is the largest body of fresh water in Southeast Asia During the dry season the Great Lake drains into the Mekong River via the Tonle Sap River During the wet season the high flows in the Mekong River cause the Tonle Sap River to reverse flow and the Great Lake floods During the peak of the flood season the area of the Great Lake increases six fold on average from 2 500 km 2 to 15 000 km 2 and its volume increases from 1 5 km 3 to between 60 and 70 km 3 At the end of the wet season flows in the Tonle Sap River revert to the normal downstream direction draining excess water off the inundated floodplain surrounding the Great Lake This hydrological cycle supports and maintains the high productivity of biodiversity within the lake particularly of fish plant communities and wildlife In Cambodia 40 of the population depends on the Tonle Sap Great Lake and its flood plains for their livelihoods Mekong Delta Near the mouth of the Mekong the Bassac River the largest distributary river channel splits from the mainstream The Mekong and Bassac Rivers split into a number of smaller watercourses and the delta expands to form a wedge shaped plain that covers an area of 62 520 km

    Original URL path: http://mrcmekong.mrcdev.info/mekong-basin/physiography/physiographic-regions/ (2016-05-01)
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  • A woman’s long and tough journey » Mekong River Commission
    which shaped my entire life The new generation shouldn t take for granted the opportunities they have today she said Despite inevitable hardship including exposure to bombing and even hunger a strong belief in the cause for independence fed Mme Khempheng s inspiration during her time in Huaphan While adapting to wartime conditions I have learned to be disciplined stand strong and fight for my country s freedom under the banner of the Party she continued Mme Khempheng s wartime experiences paved the foundation for her hard earned extraordinary achievements in development cooperation which focused on the mobilisation of financial resources and technical assistance to address the country s highest socio economic priorities including poverty eradication and sustainable development Today while in charge of WREA she continues to mobilize resources for integrated water resources and environmental management to ensure the right balance between strong economic growth the protection of the environment and the sustainable use of national natural resources is met Self improvement for professional development To achieve what she has today Mme Pholsena said she has had to constantly work on her self improvement and acquire the knowledge needed for her work Her approach can be described as learning by doing or learning from best practices As a woman you have to work three times more to be recognised you work fulltime at the office and after office hours women usually still continue to take care of their families In addition you also need to be engaged in social activities following Lao traditions she said Nevertheless there are more and more women now who are very successful in their careers and in business she continued In fact Lao PDR is a country which has about 20 of women as members of the National Assembly The Assembly is now led by Mme Pany Yathotou who was also a very successful governor of the Central Bank of Lao PDR Despite the fact that many achievements on the gender front have been reached there are still challenges in regards to gender equality in the work place maternal mortality rates malnutrition and education for all in rural areas Balancing the gender scale In Lao PDR men and women are entitled to equal rights by the Constitution said Mme Khempheng Equality does not come however by just promoting an individual because of their gender It comes rather by taking into account one s merit while giving equal chances to both men and women Therefore there is a strong need for women to be educated and feel self confident When I joined WREA Water Resources and Environment Administration in 2007 I was pleased to see how many female leaders we have and how responsible and enthusiastic they all are she recalled Today over 40 of the permanent staff in the WREA at the central level are women and five departments out of seven are led by females The numbers of professional women today in Lao PDR have drastically increased from when I began my career

    Original URL path: http://mrcmekong.mrcdev.info/mekong-basin/stories-from-the-mekong/a-woman-s-long-and-tough-journey/ (2016-05-01)
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  • A life less ordinary » Mekong River Commission
    ground and herded my cattle away to my friend s farm he said These are simple methods he has innovated to deal with unusually intense floods that have hit the wetland here Bueng That Luang The marsh has been a lifeline for him and his family as a source of fish snails and vegetables that his family relies on for their main income During the dry season his family cultivates rice in a plot of land that is usually swamped during the rainy season If numbers of fish are decreased or there are much less for me to catch it could be hard for us to survive said Mr Sai ngern who sells fish snails and vegetables he gathers from the pond at a market located in the suburb of Vientiane This wetland is a network of canals and ponds that remain fertile even in the dry season It absorbs water flowing from the Mekong River as well as waste water from the city s municipality It has played a key role in purifying water pollution and naturally controlling flood something considered a boon for the city s dwellers Bueng That Luang is also a rich source of biodiversity However like many other wetlands in the Mekong region it is likely to be affected by predicted changes of climate conditions With a projected increase in rainfall and temperature throughout the Mekong River Basin this and other wetlands are among those anticipated to bear the brunt of impacts of climate change There could be more intense rainfall in the wet season which could also last for a shorter period said Peter John Meynell a wetlands expert who has worked in the region for a decade He was sharing his perspectives on worst case scenarios of climate change impacts in the Mekong Basin Less rain and longer dry seasons can also be expected he said Changes such as these in weather patterns means the biodiversity of wetlands in the basin are likely to be at risk Different types of wetland habitats vegetation fish insects and amphibians could be affected said Mr Meynell This trend could be translated into changes in the livelihoods of people living in different marshes in the basin he said At Bueng That Luang alone thousands of people depend on the 20 km2 marsh as a primary source for their food and income A man fishes in Bueng That Luang a marsh on the eastern edge of Vientiane The Mekong River Commission an inter governmental body that works with regional stakeholders on the issue has recently commissioned the International Centre for Environment Management ICEM in collaboration with IUCN WorldFish Centre and the Southeast Asia START a regional research centre to conduct an assessment study on the impacts and vulnerability of wetlands to climate change in the Lower Mekong Basin The project will consider how changes to weather patterns will affect the different types of wetland habitats found in the basin said Hanne Bach MRC s Environment Programme s Chief

    Original URL path: http://mrcmekong.mrcdev.info/mekong-basin/stories-from-the-mekong/a-life-less-ordinary/ (2016-05-01)
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