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  • Ancients.info - Articles - Coins - On the Occurrence of Abnormally Low Weight and Specific Gravity in Ancient Coins
    explanation for both the abnormally low eight and the abnormally low specific gravity observed in the coin is thus obvious for the metal of which it was composed was for the most part spongy and porous in other words full of minute cavities After examining this coin and obtaining the facts above given I recalled that I had in my own collection a late Ptolemaic tetradrachm 2 that had always appeared to be to be exceptionally light in weight though fully of normal size The actual weight was now found to be only 7 98 grams A careful determination of the specific gravity of this coin gave the result 5 66 which is close to that of the coin submitted by Mr Stein though actually even a little lower This coin had also been cleaned Examination of the metal showed that it had the same sort of extensive spongy structure The question that now remains to be answered is this Was the spongy structure observed in these two coins produced at the time of minting or was it a subsequent development Aside from the small likelihood that coins of such low weight would have been accepted in circulation there is the strong probability on technical grounds that the spongy structure was a subsequent development Is is not generally realized how deep the processes of corrosion often extend into the metal of ancient coins of billon or bronze that have been buried in the earth for centuries Though such coins may have only a very thin patina or layer of corrosion products visible on their surface and thus appear to have been but little affected the corrosion may in fact extend deep into the metal This internal corrosion always tends to occur in the boundaries between the grains of crystals of the metal and frequently the metal of an ancient coin or other metal object is so affected by what is known technically as intergranular corrosion that the actual metal that remains is all or nearly all in the form of numerous isolated grains or crystals wholly surrounded by corrosion products 3 When a coin extensively corroded in this way is cleaned chemically with solvents these solvents dissolve out the intergranular corrosion products to a greater or less degree depending upon the nature of the solvent and the duration of treatment If the solvent is active and the time extended nearly all the corrosion products may be dissolved out thus leaving the whole coin in a spongy condition The action is similar when electrolytic methods of cleaning are used except that some of the intergranular corrosion products will be reduced to new metal that will in part be plated back on the uncorroded metal in the coin However the final result is similar for the cleaned coin will seldom be composed of compact metal It will be remembered that both the coin submitted by Mr Stein and the one in my own collection had been cleaned The methods of cleaning are

    Original URL path: http://www.ancients.info/modules.php?name=Sections&op=viewarticle&id=22 (2016-05-01)
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  • Ancients.info - Articles - Fakes & Forgeries - Hoard coinage deviates from traditional style
    a mark of distinction It appears as the dominant element on several issues and also as a mint mark on others The helmet itself may have represented a cult like militarism with deep social implications see Kevin Cheek s article about helmets on coins The Celator November 1989 Although the helmet depicted on the Black Sea Hoard diobols is similar in composition to helmets found on pre hoard coins the manner of representation or style is quite different The helmet portrayed is of a classic Corinthian type with a lateral crest This type of helmet was made from a single sheet of bronze and formed by pounding over a stake The lines were typically straight and simple see fig 1 While some of these helmets were decorated with crests and sculptural or engraved scenes the majority were plain The lateral crest is less commonly seen than its front to back counterpart however it was employed as a helmet ornamentation at about this same time by Spartan soldiers see fig 2 A review of pre hoard Mesembria diobols from a wide variety of illustrated sources including major collections in museums confirms certain commonalities within the series 1 a horsehair tail hangs from the crest of which it is an extension on each side of the helmet 2 the eye opening cutouts are clearly recessed from the flat surface plane of the forehead area 3 the nose protection plate is elevated from the flat surface plane of the forehead area and is a continuation of that flat surface 4 the angular cheek protectors are flat and linear that is unmodelled 5 the overall appearance is unemotional and rather geometric see fig 3 Examination of seven Mesembria hoard specimens all from different dies confirms that they too have commonalities 1 the horsehair tail is not in any case tied to the crest but rather eminates mysteriously from the side of the helmet 2 the eye openings are accentuated by using eyebrows and eyelids of a human like form which vary in size and shape so as to give each of the hoard specimens a facial character of its own 3 The nose protection plate is in each case rendered not as a flat plate extending downward from the forehead area but rather as a nose in itself The appendage clearly originates between the eye openings and the nose flares toward the nostrils often widening from the bridge to the base 4 the cheek protectors are modelled with high and low relief areas which give the illusion of cheek bones 5 the overall appearance of Mesembria hoard coins is that of a stylized human face complete with emotions rather than that of a lifeless piece of armor see fig 4 Comparisons of hoard coins with pre hoard specimens from Apollonia Pontica see fig 5 are somewhat more difficult due to the scarcity of the latter A few general conclusions however seem justifiable Pre hoard examples tend to be much less sculptural and less animated

    Original URL path: http://www.ancients.info/modules.php?name=Sections&op=viewarticle&id=21 (2016-05-01)
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  • Ancients.info - Articles - Coins - Coin motifs and civic pride
    some remain as powerful as the Roman SPQR These civic icons were often used on coins because the very nature of coinage required the backing and prestige of its issuing authority In the case of Athens the icon was Athena s wise and dependable owl Places that figured prominently in important myths often chose related images like Hercules at Thasos or Pegasos at Corinth Other cities chose to herald their civic pride with commercial icons The famous amphorae of Chios for example adorned many of that island city s coins The icons of these places like the SPQR of Rome did not appear solely on coinage They were more deeply imbedded images that may be seen on a variety of surviving artifacts from the ancient world One of the most closely related to coinage is the amphora stamp Producers of pottery and particularly amphorae often used coins as a stamp of identification and presumably of quality sort of like the Levi label on today s jeans They must also have engraved their own punches with coin motifs because some stamps bear clearly recognizable coin images yet lack essential details Of course there was no way of stopping an industrious entrepeneur from stamping his own amphorae with a coin from Thasos Rhodes or Knidos How many Levi jeans are made in China While numismatists have produced sylloges for coins SNG the vase lovers of the world have recorded the ex tant pottery in Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum CVA Any casual perusal of the volumes there are a great many will reveal stamped pottery of one form or another There is actually quite a bit of published material about these stamped vases Virginia Grace being one of the most published experts in this field see V R Grace Stamped Amphora Handles found in

    Original URL path: http://www.ancients.info/modules.php?name=Sections&op=viewarticle&id=19 (2016-05-01)
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  • Ancients.info - Articles - Coins - Did ancient celators use magnifying lenses?
    produced Approximately 50 lens shaped crystals were discovered by Heinrich Schliemann at Troy one of which was over two inches in diameter 5 Most of these were perforated in the center leading contemporary authorities to conclude they were ornaments and not lenses However a center perforation would allow an ideal means of carrying the lens and would not hinder its ability to kindle a fire Another early lens has been dated to ca 900 700 B C and was discovered in Nimrud in 1853 This lens is plano convex and 35x41 mm across and 6 mm at its thickest This lens was the subject of an article in the British Journal of Physiological Optics in 1930 Vol IV No 1 6 Perhaps the most important discovery was a Roman period magnifying lens discovered in 1854 in the House of the Engraver on the Stabian Way in Pompeii It is plano convex with a corroded opaque surface and is in the gem collection at the National Museum in Naples The fact that such a lens was discovered in the shop of an ancient engraver is highly significant 7 Two more lenses were discovered in the house of an artist in Tanis Egypt by Flinders Petrie He dated the destruction of the house to AD 174 Again both lenses are plano convex and reside at the British Museum They are about 2 1 2 inches in diameter and have a focal length of about 3 1 2 inches 8 I personally feel it is most unrealistic to assume that during the first millennium BC no one would have looked through a lens or polished gem at a small object and not noticed its magnifying properties Rather it is far more reasonable to assume that the practical use of such an image magnifier was simply not generally appreciated or written about The total number of ancient lenses in existence today is not known although they must number in the hundreds Among the museums possessing ancient lenses which are recognized as such are the British Museum London Archaeological Museum Herakleion 23 lenses on display and more in storage National Museum Naples Candia Museum Crete Lavigerie Museum Carthage Archaeological Museum Istanbul There are two explanations for the precision obtained by ancient engravers when producing extremely small details first that the work was done with the unaided but myopic eye and second that simple magnifying lenses were used Since there is no doubt that lenses existed in the late Greek and Roman worlds the only question concerns their possible use as magnifiers Pliny the Roman historian mentions that gem engravers complained of considerable eye strain 9 This should not argue against the use of magnifying lenses but possibly suggest that the use of such lenses was not universal in ancient times or that imperfect lenses created eye strain ed Even more challenging than die engraving is the Roman art of gold glass portrait medallions In this art a portrait would be incised on gold leaf and

    Original URL path: http://www.ancients.info/modules.php?name=Sections&op=viewarticle&id=20 (2016-05-01)
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  • Ancients.info - Downloads - Collecting Tools - AncientAssistant Beta
    so forth If it has been a little while since you looked at it might be worth your time You can also build your own obverse and reverse legends in the database it is quite expandable Anyways I would be more than happy to test it for you I have included two images of a provincial coin report from a coin I entered into Moneta as an example I just added a city to it to show the city vs mint feature And in the interest of full disclosure I should note that we are resellers of Moneta but were users of Moneta long before we had the opportunity to sell it Let me know if you have questions I would be happy to try and answer them for you Tony www commonbronze com Da Minnesota Pollock Report User Search Jun 22 2006 04 42 PM Comment 4 Cool Proggie mikepellerin Registered User I had an older version of this that was supplied on a CD by Nemesis Ancients but it never worked right and always blew up This version is so very stable I love it I didn t know how to create a new dat file so I just edited the Sample one Am I gonna have trouble doing that I only put in 3 entries and deleted some samples so I should be OK if I need to do something to create my own DAT file Mike Report User Search Aug 10 2006 08 12 AM Comment 5 Please Help Kind of Urgent mikepellerin Registered User When I installed the program I just went about editing the Sample dat file I have about 20 entries in it I ve since created a new dat file mike dat and can t figure out how to move or copy the entries from the sample dat to mike dat I m hoping I don t need to re type the whole listing for each coin If I do need to retype or cut and paste the whole thing then how do I get rid of all the old back ups I created I was thinking that with the program running and after I have the new entries in the new dat file to go and just delete all the old backups then run Maintenance and back up anew Well any help any user can supply me with will be greatly appreciated Thanx in advance Mike Mike Report User Search Aug 14 2006 11 35 AM Comment 6 Problem Solved mikepellerin Registered User I simply exported the DB list as a TXT file uninstalled the program reinstalled then imported the TXT file after creating a new DB Mike Report User Search Feb 6 2007 12 34 PM Comment 7 NumberFive Registered User Is this software still available How could I obtain a copy The link no longer seems to work Thanks Jon Report User Search Feb 17 2007 06 36 AM Comment 8 Flavian Registered User This link to the zip

    Original URL path: http://www.ancients.info/modules.php?name=Downloads&file=viewarticle&id=2 (2016-05-01)
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  • Ancients.info - Downloads - Screensavers - Twelve Caesars
    in Windows Explorer and select the Install option Note that you must be logged in to see the link admin Profile User WWW Search Add To Budylist Extras Printable Version Email A Friend Visit Link Snip Comments Visit Link Twelve Caesars Screensavers Previous Next Rate Article 5 Best 4 3 Average 2 1 Worst May 21 2008 05 00 AM Comment 1 tcore Registered User This screen saver is awesome Thanks for your hard work Report User Search Oct 14 2015 09 12 AM Comment 2 Download Working Gris Registered User Please excuse my noob first post here but when I click on the zip link to download the file it takes me to a blank black page am I doing something wrong edit Ok figured it out doesn t work with Firefox Report User Search Page Top Module Rules You May not Add New Articles You May not Add New Comments You May not Add Attachments You May not Edit Comments HTML Code Is Off BB Code Is On Smilies Are On IMG Code Is On Category Jump Collecting Tools Attribution Tools Screensavers Site Development Tools Home Downloads Screensavers Today in History 37 AD Antonia dies presumably forced to

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  • Ancients.info - The Online Resource for Ancient Coins & Antiquities - Search Forums
    Months Ago 6 Months Ago A Year Ago and Newer and Older Sort Results by Relevancy Title Number of Replies Number of Views Thread Start Date Last Posting Date User Name Forum in Descending Order in Ascending Order Show Results as Show Results as Threads Posts Search in Forum s Search All Open Forums Search Subscribed Forums General Site Announcements Beginning Collectors Attribution Help Site Suggestions Off topic Conversations Contests

    Original URL path: http://www.ancients.info/forums/search.php (2016-05-01)
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  • Ancients.info - The Online Resource for Ancient Coins & Antiquities
    Members List Calendar Search Today s Posts Mark Forums Read vBulletin Message Sorry no matches Please try some different terms All times are GMT 6 The time now is 10 28 AM Contact Us Home Archive Top Powered by vBulletin

    Original URL path: http://www.ancients.info/forums/search.php?do=getdaily (2016-05-01)
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